What teachers could learn from my mother about technology

The road to learning

A topic regularly discussed on Twitter is how to bring teachers, new to and uncomfortable with technology, to the table to support them with the rapid infusion of tech in education.  Anything new takes time and can seem daunting, but we expect our students to do this on a daily basis.  So why does the teacher culture seem to shy away from doing the same, or expect a grand session of professional development to bring them the comfort they need.

So what does my mother have to do with any of this?  My mother is a self proclaimed technology novice.  My father worked for IBM for 30 years and I clearly inherited his technology brain. My mother, who regularly typed papers for me on a typewriter, now looks to me or my father to type up items on the computer.  I accept this trade off for her years of stretching…

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About Sharon LePage Plante

Sharon Plante, an educator with 22 years teaching experience in special education, has been an educator at The Southport School for fourteen years, as well as currently serving as Director of Technology. She utilizes her educational training and love of technology to engage students with learning disabilities in building their skills and finding success. Sharon is the co-author of Using Technology to Engage Students with Learning Disabilities. She was awarded the 2016 Distinguished Alumni Award from George Mason University College of Education and Human Development. She has presented at Everyone Reading, EdRev, Edscape, ATIA (Assistive Technology Industry Association), Spotlight on Dyslexia, IDA (International Dyslexia Association) and New York Chapter of ALTA (Academic Language Trainers Association), as well as at several EdCamps, on using technology to empower the dyslexic learner. Sharon is a co-founder of #edtechchat, and co-organizer of EdCampSWCT.
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